Pharmacology
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More than ten years after its release, Pharma continues to attract designers worldwide for its unique aesthetic. Operating in the conflictual zone between technology and nature, Pharma combines a tubular structure with smooth organic shapes. It is not surprising if this conceptual approach reminds of product design, since Julien Gaillardot developed the typeface while designing the first monograph devoted to Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec back in 2003.

Now completed with italics and an extended character set, Pharma offers a wider range of  applications to graphic designers in search of a strong yet fluid identity.

 
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology
Practice Makes Perfect
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François Rappo’s latest project is a significant outcome of his design practice anchored in the research of typographic paradigms. In the mapping of serif typography, Practice introduces a new perspective with an unprecedented sharpness.

While its architecture revisits the elegance of Renaissance typography, an innovative calligraphic drawing was achieved to reach a crisp digital identity. The precise texture of Practice is outstanding on both paper and screen. The optical balance of the text rythm offers a clear reading with a contemporary aesthetic.

Practice is declined in a consistent gradient of styles to provide a complete tool for magazines, books and newspapers. The family is structured in three display weights designed for larger sizes and six roman weights for smaller sizes plus their matching italics. Each style offers five series of numerals, small caps and an extended ligature set.

  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
  • Practice Makes Perfect
Liquid Modernity
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Four decades after its first sketches by legendary Team’77, we are delighted to release a sleeping beauty of Swiss modern typography: Media77.

In 1974, André Gürtler, Christian Mengelt, and Erich Gschwind were commissioned by Bobst Graphic in Lausanne to draw a text typeface specifically conceived for phototypesetting. Rather than a constraint, they considered that the technical parameters of the composing system could bring interesting typographic solutions detached from the historical classifications: not another replica, but the design of a contemporary typeface with a modern purpose. Forty years later, the redrawing of Media by the original members of Team’77 showcases their mastership: an extraordinarily sophisticated typeface with a unique aesthetic, very legible at small sizes and full of refined details at display sizes.

Team’77 has been founded in January 1977 by André Gürtler, Christian Mengelt, and Erich Gschwind.

  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
  • Liquid Modernity
Picture me and then you start watching – Ceremony (New Order)
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Designed by Studio Joost Grootens, Ceremony is an unprecedented typeface. Drawn for use in small sizes, it combines a full extended latin character set with 178 pictograms, all encapsulated in 77 different positive and negative geometric shapes.

Based in Amsterdam, Joost Grootens is well-known for his innovative thinking on Atlases where he regularly set new milestones in compelling books – Metropolitan World Atlas (2005), Atlas of the Conflict (2010) or Atlas of the Functional City (2015) to name but a few. To meet the specific requirements of his map and index designs, Grootens and his studio developed over a six year period a library of icons that was continuously extended and refined. The resulting typeface is an outstanding tool that defines a new standard for typography in information design.

Grootens designs books in the fields of architecture, urban space and art. A monograph about his work titled I swear I use no art at all was published by 010 Publishers in 2010.

Ceremony by Studio Joost Grootens

  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
  • Picture me and then you start watching - Ceremony (New Order)
Optical Surfaces
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Every word could be a logotype. Text composes effortlessly balanced lines. It works from footnote to poster size. The graphic aesthetic is unique yet universal. 

Few typefaces have qualified to this level of visual alchemy, epitomized by the classic Helvetica from the photo lettering times. 

If Plain is so fluid, it is thanks a drawing that is neither constrained by a geometrical approach nor structured after the idiosyncrasy of the stroke. Glyphs are designed optically, as plain surfaces and, under an apparent modern simplicity, their dynamic interaction create a distinctive identity.

Plain is the achievement of years of research by François Rappo, whose Theinhardt family had set a milestone in revisiting Grotesque typeface design. It comes in an exceptionally large range of twelve weights and their matching italics, offering graphic designers a complete tool to make the best use of its potential.

  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
  • Optical Surfaces
The Graphic Style
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A major aesthetic in the history of type design, Clarendon has been revisited many times since its appearance in the 1840s, notably in Switzerland in the 1950s. Drawn by François Rappo, Clarendon Graphic was designed to bring the graphic identity of the genre to a new level and to complete its modernist potential.

Each style, from Hairline to Black, achieves an exceptional optical balance. Through the quality of its details, Clarendon Graphic is a highly graphic, fluid and dynamic typeface. It works beautifully both at large and small sizes, as it has been specifically optimized for text. And, for the first time, a modern Clarendon has two complete sets of italics: one Slanted Roman and one true Cursive Italic. Finally, the family is completed with a set of fresh and playful Stencils cuts.

Through the quality of its design and the variety of its 26 styles, Clarendon Graphic covers the entire range of applications of contemporary graphic design: from display to running text, from the page to architecture.

  • The Graphic Style
  • The Graphic Style
  • The Graphic Style
  • The Graphic Style
Px Grotesk – when Pixels become Curves
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For more than two decades, typography and screen technology have not been dissociated. While the impact of the screen on the design has remained an ongoing issue for designers, Nicolas Eigenheer capitalized on the limitation of the pixel to research how technological parameters could create new forms in typography.

‘Px Grotesk’ is designed after the rendering of typographic curves on screens. At smaller sizes, pixels sometimes simplify the shapes brutally. From this antagonism, Nicolas Eigenheer has designed a typeface that embeds the screen parameters into a classic linear drawing. The result is hybrid as the shapes combine formal solutions from the pixel grid and a linear drawing.

The font works both for screen and print use, and its geometrical simplification offers a spectacular legibility and sharpness at small sizes. At bigger sizes, it reveals a sophisticated drawing and an unprecedented aesthetic for a classic grotesque. ‘Px Grotesk’ is available as a three-weights family, with an extra pixel cut.

  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
  • Px Grotesk - when Pixels become Curves
Programmed Calligraphy
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Developed over the past four years by the Swiss design studio Maximage, Programme is an innovative typeface which is based both on calligraphy and computer programming. With the help of scripting technology, the typeface was developed in two different versions: a more sophisticated and a rougher angular cut. Through OpenType features, the user is able to switch between the two main styles or to combine letters of the two.

Optimized for both text and display needs, the family is available in four weights, including italics and extra rotated versions. As an additional cut, Programme Primitiv is the ‘original’ version generated by the script – without any retouching and grading – this archetype perfectly meets display requirements as its simple and brutal sharpness add to the visual experience.

The first version of Programme was shown in the book Typeface as Program (JRP|Ringier, 2009). The book summarizes a series of projects related to programming and type design which took place at the University of Art and Design Lausanne (ECAL).

  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
  • Programmed Calligraphy
Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
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We are delighted to introduce ‘Stanley’ a new compact family designed by Ludovic Balland. Inspired by one of the most classic typefaces of the 20th century, ‘Times New Roman’, by Stanley Morison, ‘Stanley’ combines a strong graphic personality with solid functional qualities. The result is a font which can distinctly perform a great range of duties.

Based in Basel, Ludovic Balland is an established graphic designer enjoying international recognition. He is particularly well known for his bold graphic design work for books and posters. It is with the same impulse and energy that he created ‘Stanley’. 

Sharing comparable qualities with its inspirational precursor, ‘Stanley’ offers excellent legibility and incredible sharpness at very small sizes. With five cuts, ‘Stanley’ can fulfill versatile needs, from footnotes to headlines. The distinct details in the drawing give a unique tone to any text.

  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison
  • Stanley: Happy Birthday Mr. Morison